Growing up in the heartland of industrial decay in the “Black Country” of England, and later traveling the globe through my telecom career, I’ve been a first-hand witness to the benefits of globalization and also to the personal disenfranchising impact it can bring. But globalization itself — simply the efficient movement of goods, money, information and people across borders — is in many respects a byproduct of other changes. Today’s drivers are connectivity and automation, enabled by the massive technological revolution that is under way by way of an increasingly global, mobile and intelligent internet.
We’ve been here before. As with previous industrial revolutions, this digital age is delivering many positive socioeconomic benefits to our lives, yet also causing considerable disruption and inequalities that must be addressed. For example, in developing nations it has already been responsible for helping move a billion people out of poverty and into the global economy. …
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